JBU > Intermediate

Beer and Cookie Pairings

Forget about milk and cookies! Here are three different beers that pair perfectly with your favourite kinds of cookies!

Beer and Cookie Pairings

1. Great Divide Hibernation Ale with a Salted Caramel Chocolate cookie

beer and cookie pairing

Hibernation Ale is an English-style old ale that Denver’s Great Divide brews each winter as a seasonal beer. The toffee, sweet notes from the malt and hop bitterness in the beer balances with the sweetness and richness of the cookie. At 8.7% ABV, the beer leaves a warming sensation while the cookie finishes with a salty sugar flavor. Together, the pairing leaves a warming wintery impression.

 

2. Avery Brewing The Reverend with an Oatmeal Raisin cookie

The Reverend is a Belgian-style quadrupel ale with molasses and dried cherry flavors at a potent 10% ABV. The golden raisin flavors in the beer are a perfect match for the actual raisins in the cookie — and likewise the cloying sweetness in the beer matches the sugary cookie. The hint of cinnamon in the cookie also accentuated the subtle spice in the beer.

 

3. Oskar Blues Ten Fidy with a Double Fudge White Chip cookie

Ten Fidy is a big, bold imperial stout with dark chocolate and coffee with hints of tobacco. The bitterness from the 10% ABV, roasted barley and strong hop presence balances with the decadent, over-the-top sweetness of the cookie. The rich chocolate flavors build on each other, too, making this likely the best pairing of the batch.

 

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