Storage, Serving & Glasses

Beer Cans vs. Bottles — What’s Better & Why?

Beer Bottles vs. Beer Cans: What is the best vessel to drink beer from? Do cans keep beer fresher? Have all your questions about the difference between beer cans and bottles answered in this ultimate showdown.

Beer Cans vs. Bottles — What’s Better & Why?

When it comes to beer, the container it is packaged in has created a great divide. We’ve decided to put them both to the ultimate test. In one corner, cans. And in the other, bottles. Cue the bell!

 

Round 1: Portability

Which weighs less — bottles or cans?

A six-pack of 12oz canned beer weighs 2.5lbs less than a six-pack of 12oz bottled beer. This makes cans more portable than bottles as they are lighter to carry. Not only are cans easier to pack on a hiking trip, but they are also easier to store in the fridge. Cans can be stacked on top of each other making them the better option for a mini fridge.

Round 1 Winner: Cans!

Cans are off to a great start! They are lighter, won’t break when travelling on a bumpy road, and will be easier to store when you arrive at your destination!

 

Round 2: Taste

Can you taste the difference between beer in cans and bottles?

Many people believe that drinking out of an aluminum can will leave your craft beer tasting like metal, but did you know that there is a lining in every beer can that prevents the beer and aluminum from coming into contact? Manufacturers have been lining cans since 1935. If you truly believe that you’re tasting a metallic flavour, try pouring your beer into a glass and try again. Most of the time, that metallic “flavour” you’re sensing is instead the scent of the beer can. While beer bottles won’t make your beer taste like metallic, neither will cans. If your beer still tastes metallic, it might be for one of these reasons.

Round 2 Winner: Tie!

There isn’t any evidence that shows beer tastes differently coming out of a can or a bottle. Still not convinced? Try an at-home tasting experiment and see if you can tell the difference!

 


Did you know that actually receive more of the intended flavours of your beer when drinking beer out of a glass?
Click here to learn more about the benefits of drinking beer from a glass.

 

Round 3: Beer Protection

Will my beer go skunky?

UV rays from light can cause your beer to go “skunky“, and because a beer can is opaque, it does not allow UV rays to enter. Clear, blue and green bottles are especially notorious for letting light in. The good news for bottles is that dark brown, amber glass blocks about 99% of light.

Speaking of protecting your beer — if dropped, a beer in an aluminum can is most likely going to survive over a glass bottle.

Round 3 Winner: Cans!

Your beer is most protected from light in cans. Also, unlike bottles, cans are sealed airtight so it is less likely for air to get in.

 

Round 4: Recyclability

What is better for the environment — cans or bottles?

Did you know that aluminum is the most recyclable material and that discarded aluminum is more valuable than any other item you’ll find in your recycling bin? An aluminum beer can also be recycled indefinitely.

Round 4 Winner: Cans!

Cans are the clear winner in round 3 as there are no facts that lead to glass bottles being better for our planet. The cost to recycle a can is much less than the cost of manufacturing a new can, so make sure you’re recycling those empty brews!

 

Round 5: Opening

Are beer bottles or cans more effortless?

Unless you’ve got long, acrylic nails, beer cans are definitely easier to open than beer bottles because you don’t need an opener.

When it comes to the nice cracking sound of a beer bottle or can opening, both are equally satisfying. Listen to the sound of a can opening and a bottle opening, and you decide!

Round 5 Winner: Cans!

While the feeling that opening a bottle or can of beer gives you is equally enjoyable, not needing an opener to enjoy your beer gives cans the upper leg in round 5.

 

Beer Bottles vs. Beer Cans: The Verdict

While cans seems to be a clear winner in the above categories, we suggest drinking from whatever vessel you like. Whether it is a bottle, can, or you’re chugging in an upside down keg stand, we won’t judge!

However, if you want our honest opinion, we’d recommend drinking your beer from a glass.

 

Now that you’ve decided where you stand on beer cans vs bottles, check out these other great posts:

Hoppy vs. Bitter — What’s the difference?
The Best Beer Pairings for your Favourite Fast Food Orders
12 Types of People You Can Find at Every Beer Festival
How to Make Beer Jello Shots

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