JBU > Intermediate

Beer Styles 201: Double/Imperial IPA

What do you get when you take the intensity of a Russian Imperial Stout and an IPA? A Double IPA (Imperial IPA), of course! Learn more about this fascinating style.

Beer Styles 201: Double/Imperial IPA

Style Name: Double or Imperial IPA

Style Region: West Coast USA

Appearance: Most Double IPAs have a hazy golden-amber colour.

Flavor & Aroma: Double IPAs are not only stronger than little bro IPA, but are often sweeter and hoppier. As opposed to barley wines which are similarly strong, but the balance is on the sweetness in Double IPAs there is balance, but more towards the hops. Sweetness plays a supporting role.

Palate & Mouthfeel: This style has an all around intense mouthfeel. It is robust, malty, alcoholic and yet still manages a pretty bitter mouthfeel.

Food Pairings: Because of the intensity of this style it is generally not recommended to go with food. It is usually a stand alone, but if you insist fatty and salty foods are best because they cut through the intensity. Try pork sausage, cured meats or salted caramel ice cream.

Comments: This style got its name because it is super strong with ABVs ranging from 7-14%. Imperial comes from the strong stouts brewed by England for the Russian Empire in the 1700s that had similarly strong ABVs. Double is used more often in the USA and Imperial is used more often in the UK.

Style Comparison: IPA, Russian Imperial Stout

 

Learn More at Just Beer University

Beer Styles 201: Gruit Beer

Beer Styles 201: Gose

Beer Styles 201: India Pale Ales

Beer Styles 201: Stout

 

 

 

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