JBU > Intermediate

Beer Styles 201: Strong Ale

Strong Ales: where they come from, their appearance, flavour & aroma, palate & mouthfeel, food pairings and serving suggestions are all explained in this Beer Styles 201 article.

Beer Styles 201: Strong Ale

What are Strong Ales?

Strong Ales are known for their high alcohol content, usually 8% – 15%, and come in a variety of colours from different places around the world.

If bottle conditioned, Strong ales can improve for several years. Some Strong Ales have very close similarities to Barleywines and Old Ales.

 

Strong Ale Essential Information:

 

Style Region:

England, North America, Belgium

Appearance:

Strong Ales range from gold to amber and copper to dark brown. They have variable clarity and head retention.

Flavour & Aroma:

Strong Ales tend to have a pronounced yeast character which can make them fruity or spicy. Strong beers are also exceptionally rich and flavorful with a bold malt character.

Palate & Mouthfeel:

These beers tend to have a low carbonation, and warming qualities from the high alcohol content. Their finish is long and complex.

What foods pair well with a Strong Ale?

The strong nature of these beers stand really well with lamb or strong cheeses. If you want dessert then a Strong Ale is perfect with crème brûlee or dark chocolate.

How to serve Strong Ales:

Strong Ales should be served at cellar temperature 50-55℉ (10-15℃) in a chalice, goblet, tulip or snifter glass.

Similar Beer Styles:

Winter Warmer, Old Ale, English Barleywine

 

Now that you’re a Strong Ale genius, read up on other beer styles:

Amber Ale / Dark Ale
Amber Lager / Dark Lager
Belgian IPA / White India Pale Ale
Berliner Weisse
Bock
Golden Ale / Blonde Ale
Golden Lager / Pale Lager
Gose
Gruit Beer
India Pale Ale (IPA)
Imperial IPA / Double India Pale Ale
Pilsner
Weizenbock
Wheat Beer

Related Posts

JBU > Intermediate

Beer Varieties: The Origins (Part Three: Colour)

In this series, we are exploring what characterizes the hundreds of styles of beers that are available. While yeast is the most important determinant of beer style, two of the other main ingredients (hops and malt), and how the beer is brewed, among other things, also play a part. It is these factors that create the inherent qualities of the beer, which formulates each category or style. Part Two looked at how gravities and alcohol by volume (ABV.) are calculated. In Part Three we will explore colour; how it is measured, and how the different colours are assigned.

Enticing Eats

Food & Wine: Fresh Herb and Wine Pairing Guide

When planning a dinner party many people pair the wine with the main protein, but have you tried pairing it with the herbs in your food? This is a great way to accentuate and highlight the fresh flavors in your meals. We’ve sourced a guide to herb & wine pairing for you.

JBU > Intermediate

Beer Styles 201: Golden Ale / Blonde Ale

Golden Ales & Blonde Ales: where they come from, their appearance, flavour & aroma, palate & mouthfeel, food pairings and serving suggestionss are all explained in this Beer Styles 201 article.

Beers

Tour of German Beer Styles Part Three: Dark Beers

This part of the Tour covers dark coloured beers. Learn a little about traditional German dark styles like Schwarzbier and Doppelbock, now being produced by craft breweries around the world.

JBU > Intermediate

Guide to Grilling a Beer Can Chicken

This is an easy method for grilling a flavorful and tender chicken that keeps all eyes on the grill, and provides that “wow” factor for any cookout you host.