Beer School

What is a Weizenbock?

Weizenbocks: where they come from, their appearance, flavour & aroma, palate & mouthfeel, food pairings and serving suggestions are all explained in this Beer Styles 201 article.

What is a Weizenbock?

What is a Weizenbock?

Weizenbock is a unique, strong, wheat beer first produced in Bavaria in the early 20th century.

Weizenbocks are growing in popularity and are loved for their high ABV% and high amount of wheat malt. The German Reinheitsgebot require Weizenbock to be made with at least 50% wheat malt, but usually it is made with 60-70%. The rest is Pils, Vienna or Munich malts. Weizenbocks are known as a “winter wheat beer”.

If a Hefeweizen beer and a Dopplebock had a baby, Weizenbock would be it.

 

How to Pronounce “Weizenbock”:

“Veye-tssen-bock”

 

Weizenbock Essential Information:

 

Style Region:

Germany

Appearance:

Weizenbocks are pale to amber in color with an opaque appearance.

Flavour & Aroma:

The flavour of a Weizenbock is spicy and clove-like from the special yeast with which it is fermented.

Palate & Mouthfeel:

Slightly caramelized malts gives Weizenbocks a full-bodied mouthfeel with a rich and satisfying malty finish.

What foods pair well with Weizenbocks?

Hearty meats like venison and lamb are fabulous, but Weizenbocks work well with veal too. For something sweet, try a Weizenbock with apple pie or strudel, plum tarts or banana pudding.

How to serve a Weizenbock:

This beer varies quite a bit so you might want to serve darker versions warm and lighter versions cool, but always in a weizen glass.

Comparable styles to a Weizenbock:

Bockbier is similar in style but it is a lager and the Weizenbock is an ale. Weizenbocks can also be compared to a Hefeweizen or Weissbier but with a higher ABV%.

 

Thanks for reading about Weizenbocks. Want to learn more? Check out more beer styles below:

Amber Ale / Dark Ale
Amber Lager / Dark Lager
Barleywine
Belgian IPA / White India Pale Ale
Berliner Weisse
Bock
Double IPA / Imperial IPA
Golden Ale / Blonde Ale
Golden Lager / Pale Lager
Gose
Gruit Beer
India Pale Ale (IPA)
Pilsner
Porter
Saison
Sour Ale / Wild Ale
Stout
Strong Ale
Wheat Beer

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