Style Name: Wheat Beer (Ale)

Substyle/Region: Weissbier in Germany and Witbier in Belgium

Appearance: These straw-coloured, cloudy beers have a full and fluffy white head.

Flavour & Aroma: The German variation tends to be sweeter and maltier while the Belgian tradition uses coriander and orange peels, but both versions are tangy and refreshing. The wheat malt gives them a fresh fruity and bready character.

Palate & Mouthfeel: These effervescent beers have a creamy texture and refreshing mouthfeel despite having a medium weight. Their finish is often a little tart.

Food Pairings: Due to their refreshing mouthfeel these beers tend to go best with Quiches, shrimp and sweet and spicy Thai dishes.

Comments: Both names actually mean white beer rather than wheat beer, but due to there similar etymology in English it remains wheat beer.

Serving Suggestion: In the US, it has become common to serve these beers with a lemon or orange wedge to highlight their fruity character, but Europeans tend to frown on this practice.

Similar Beer Styles: Berliner Weisse, Gose and Hefeweizen.

Learn more about beer styles:

Beer Styles 201: Pilsners

Beer Styles 201: Gose

Beer Styles 201: Amber and Dark Ales

Beer Styles 201: Golden Ales

Related Posts

JBU > Intermediate

What is a Beer Flight?

So many things on the beer menu sound fabulous…not sure what to get? Try a beer flight.

JBU > Intermediate

Beer Styles 201 – Amber and Dark Ales

These ales are brewed in the US, Ireland and England. Sometimes seen as the predecessor to Porter style beers. Their complex malt character, pronounced bitterness and strong hops flavour makes them great for grilling season.

JBU > Intermediate

Beer Styles: The Ingredients (Part Three: Water)

In this third part of this series on beer’s ingredients, we will look at water, the largest single component of beer. As much as 90-95% of a beer can be water, yet it is easily the most overlooked constituent.

JBU > Intermediate

Beer Varieties: The Origins (Part Four: Bitterness)

In this series, we are looking at what characterises the hundreds of styles of beers that are available. So far we have looked at how gravities and alcohol by volume (ABV.) are calculated, and how colour is measured and named. In this article, we will examine bitterness, the counterbalance to the sweetness from the malt, which is derived mostly from the hops.

JBU > Intermediate

Beer Styles 201 – Pilsners

Born in 1842 in Plzeň, Czech Republic this was one of the first blond beer styles and the inspiration for most of the world’s beer today.